File a disclosure veto: adoption records

Open adoption records allow an adopted person (who is now 19 or older) and birth parents to access adoption information if they want to. A disclosure veto prevents the Disclosure Program from releasing your identifying information.

You need to file a disclosure veto to prevent the Disclosure Program from releasing your identifying information under the Adoption Records Act.

Adoption information

Open adoption records allow an adopted person (who is now 19 or older) and birth parents to access adoption information if they want to.

A disclosure veto prevents the Disclosure Program from releasing your identifying information. The veto expires if the person who filed the veto passes away or has the veto removed.

Adopted person and birth parents

Once an adopted person turns 19, they can file a disclosure veto at any time. They can also remove their disclosure veto at any time. The program won’t release identifying information about the adopted person to the birth parents until the adopted person turns 20.

A birth parent can file a disclosure veto at any time as long as the Disclosure Program hasn’t already released their identifying information. They can also choose to only share non-identifying information like medical history and social and cultural information (for example, interests, occupation and spoken languages). Medical history can be critical for an adopted person and their children or grandchildren. Social and cultural information can also be important.

Filing a disclosure veto on behalf of someone else

You can file a disclosure veto on behalf of someone who doesn’t have capacity under the Adult Capacity Decision-making Act (PDF). You need to provide information about yourself and the person you’re filing for. You need to include a copy of the court order granted under the Adult Capacity Decision-making Act as proof of consent to act as a representative. You also need to include 1 piece of government-issued identification for yourself.

Removing (cancelling) a disclosure veto

You can remove (cancel) a disclosure veto at any time. It's possible that the Disclosure Program may release your identifying information before you file, change or remove your disclosure veto.

Help with your privacy options

The Disclosure Program can help you review your privacy options, complete the Disclosure Veto Form with you and provide more information about how open adoption records work. The program also provides an option for you to speak with someone who identifies as African Nova Scotian or Indigenous.

Who can use this form

If you’re an adopted person (who is now 19 or older) or a birth parent, you can protect your privacy by filing a disclosure veto.

You need to file a separate disclosure veto for each person (you can't complete the form for more than 1 person).

What you need to do

  1. Review detailed guidance in the Disclosure Program - Adoption Records Guide.
  2. Complete the form.
  3. Check the form for details on all required supporting documents.
  4. Send your completed form and supporting documents by mail or email.

How long it takes

It should take 1 to 2 weeks for the Disclosure Program to file your disclosure veto. It can take longer if more information is needed or if your form hasn’t been filled in correctly.

Cost

There is no cost to file a disclosure veto.

Before you start

Make sure you have 2 pieces of government-issued identification (like a driver’s licence, Secure Certificate of Indian Status, passport or NEXUS card). One piece of identification needs to include your photo.

Download form


Other ways to submit the form

You can contact the Disclosure Program to complete the form by phone. Once you complete the form, send your supporting documents by mail or email to the Disclosure Program. Your disclosure veto isn’t processed until the program receives your documents.

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